Surgeries

We perform

Surgeries:

Cervical foramenotomy

Cervical foramentomy is a procedure indicated for the treatment of cervical nerve root compression (radiculopathy) particularly when the compression is coming from the back. The typical patient with cervical nerve root compression (radiculopathy) has referred arm pain, weakness, numbness in the distribution of a cervical nerve root. Cervical foramentomy might be a preferred option to an anterior approach because fusion can be avoided and two levels can be performed at the same time on the same side.

Surgery has a high chance of success (>90 per cent plus) of relief of symptoms i.e. radiculopathy.

The surgery is performed under a general anaesthetic and an incision is made on the back of the neck in the midline. The facet joints over the area of nerve root compression are trimmed back and the nerve roots are given more room to function or pulsate and then the wound is closed with dissolving sutures. The risks of surgery include cosmetic scarring, infection, haematoma, nerve root or spinal cord injury and a small risk of spinal instability.

Most patients are up the following day and going home after 3-5 days. Post operative wound pain usually take a week to settle down.

Cervical foramenotomy

Cervical foramentomy is a procedure indicated for the treatment of cervical nerve root compression (radiculopathy) particularly when the compression is coming from the back. The typical patient with cervical nerve root compression (radiculopathy) has referred arm pain, weakness, numbness in the distribution of a cervical nerve root. Cervical foramentomy might be a preferred option to an anterior approach because fusion can be avoided and two levels can be performed at the same time on the same side.

Surgery has a high chance of success (>90 per cent plus) of relief of symptoms i.e. radiculopathy.

The surgery is performed under a general anaesthetic and an incision is made on the back of the neck in the midline. The facet joints over the area of nerve root compression are trimmed back and the nerve roots are given more room to function or pulsate and then the wound is closed with dissolving sutures. The risks of surgery include cosmetic scarring, infection, haematoma, nerve root or spinal cord injury and a small risk of spinal instability.

Most patients are up the following day and going home after 3-5 days. Post operative wound pain usually take a week to settle down.