Surgeries

We perform

Surgeries:

Cervical laminectomy

Cervical laminectomy is a procedure indicated for the treatment of spinal cord compression (cervical myelopathy) and or nerve root compression (radiculopathy) particularly when the compression is coming from the back. The typical patient with spinal cord compression or myelopathy has numb, clumsy hands, reduced manual dexterity and stiff or spastic gait or walking. The typical patient with cervical nerve root compression (radiculopathy) has referred arm pain, weakness, numbness in the distribution of a cervical nerve root.

Surgery has a high chance of success (>90 per cent plus) of relief of some symptoms particularly radiculopathy however other symptoms may not relieved (numbness, weakness) particularly if spinal cord injury has occurred in which case the symptoms may persist and the main goal of surgery is to prevent further spinal cord injury occurring. This can often be predicted preoperatively based on history, examination findings and radiological findings. In this scenario the patient may have to live with these symptoms and input from a rehabilitation specialist may be helpful to manage these symptoms and expectations.

The surgery is performed under a general anaesthetic and an incision is made on the back of the neck in the midline. The lamina (bones) over the area of compression are trimmed back and the spinal cord is given more room to function or pulsate and then the wound is closed with dissolving sutures. The risks of surgery include cosmetic scarring, infection, haematoma, spinal cord injury and a small risk of spinal instability.

Most patients are up the following day and going home after 3-5 days. Post operative wound pain usually take a week to settle down.

Cervical laminectomy

Cervical laminectomy is a procedure indicated for the treatment of spinal cord compression (cervical myelopathy) and or nerve root compression (radiculopathy) particularly when the compression is coming from the back. The typical patient with spinal cord compression or myelopathy has numb, clumsy hands, reduced manual dexterity and stiff or spastic gait or walking. The typical patient with cervical nerve root compression (radiculopathy) has referred arm pain, weakness, numbness in the distribution of a cervical nerve root.

Surgery has a high chance of success (>90 per cent plus) of relief of some symptoms particularly radiculopathy however other symptoms may not relieved (numbness, weakness) particularly if spinal cord injury has occurred in which case the symptoms may persist and the main goal of surgery is to prevent further spinal cord injury occurring. This can often be predicted preoperatively based on history, examination findings and radiological findings. In this scenario the patient may have to live with these symptoms and input from a rehabilitation specialist may be helpful to manage these symptoms and expectations.

The surgery is performed under a general anaesthetic and an incision is made on the back of the neck in the midline. The lamina (bones) over the area of compression are trimmed back and the spinal cord is given more room to function or pulsate and then the wound is closed with dissolving sutures. The risks of surgery include cosmetic scarring, infection, haematoma, spinal cord injury and a small risk of spinal instability.

Most patients are up the following day and going home after 3-5 days. Post operative wound pain usually take a week to settle down.